End-of-Life, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Death Doula? What is This?

Have you wondered about these terms? Death Doula, End of Life Doula? Death Midwife? End of Life Specialist? If you have-do the words frighten you? Scare you? Make you pause and wonder?

You realize that death is part of life, right? To be born we must die. Death is part of the life cycle.

Does death frighten you? Do you fear death? Are you scared of death? If you are-why?

Life your life full of richness, joy, happiness, with meaning, and share with the ones you care about and love, spend time with them, phone them, write them, text them….let them know how you feel. Do not have regrets. Find a job or profession that you love or are passionate about. Take up hobbies, exercise, eat healthy, develop good relationships, volunteer, give back whether through time, money, ideas….be a part of society.

The link within will explain what a death doula is, how the term came about, what it entails. Remember birth comes first and their are doulas and midwives for this, so why not for death-the end of the life cycle.

If you were dying or a friend was dying would you want them to have someone to talk to? To be with them? To offer comfort? To help organize the things that need to be put in place like wills, funeral arrangements, a celebration of life ceremony before they die? How about someone to assist the caregivers-offer support and guidance? Do not see the terms of death doula, death midwife or End of Life Doula as negative or fearful?

The individuals that fulfill these roles are compassionate, caring, empathic, and special because not everyone can do it. It is just like being a nurse, a doctor, a social worker, a teacher. Special roles that not everyone is up to the task to fulfill.

“End-of-life doulas provide non-medical, holistic support and comfort to the dying person and their family, which may include education and guidance as well as emotional, spiritual or practical care.”
-End of Life Doula Network

Most end of life doulas are non-licensed and non-medical. But there are many who are starting with a foundation as chaplains, nurses, certified nursing assistants, social workers, life coaches, reiki practitioners, psychicians, shamans, and therapists, among other professionals. Or, they may be adding an end of life component to their present practice.

What an end of life doula ‘does’ really depends on what skill set the doula has and what they want to focus upon now.
Our common, basic offering is this: emotional and spiritual companioning, with some practical support as well. You may also find an end of life doula who offers caregiving and practical house/errand/cooking services or cooking and meal prep. You may find an end of life doula who specializes in advance directives and advance care planning, funeral planning, memorial planning, medical assistance, and legal assistance. There are others whose main focus is using ceremony and ritual to help you transition and cope with the loss that is coming, as well as afterwards. There are end of life doulas who are therapists and only focus on end of life issues and companioning others through that time. There are home funeral guides, bedside singers, and end of life doulas whose focus is on helping the family with legacy tributes.

I am hoping that after reading all this you realize the positives of the terms, Death Doula, End of Life Doula, Death Midwife, End of Life Specialist,  and see the benefits of individuals who have sought training, are receiving training in this area.

http://www.qualityoflifecare.com/blog/doulasfor-the-dying

My training is taking place with another individual and company, Patty Burgess of Possibility, Doing Death Differently.

Patty  has years of experience and her credentials are below:

-President of Possibility, Doing Death Differently
-Certified End-of-Life Specialist (CEOLS)
-End-of-Life Doula/DoulaPro
-Hospice Volunteer
-Certified Grief Recovery Specialist
-End-of-Life Educator, Speaker/Trainer
-Former Hospice Community Educator/Patient Liasion

http://doingdeathdifferently.com/

One should choose the program or training of the individual that they resonate with and a program that fits in with your work and life style-in-person, online, weekend workshops, etc.

End-of-Life, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Grief Healing: Pet Euthanasia: When Is It Time to Say Goodbye? — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

Good advice and worth a look!

 

Source: Grief Healing: Pet Euthanasia: When Is It Time to Say Goodbye?

via Grief Healing: Pet Euthanasia: When Is It Time to Say Goodbye? — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Shared via Barbara Karnes – Just Because You Get Sad Doesn’t Mean You Aren’t Healing | Thought Catalog — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

We have to stop being so hard on ourselves…sadness is normal. If we were happy all the time, we would never truly appreciate happiness…

Source: Just Because You Get Sad Doesn’t Mean You Aren’t Healing | Thought Catalog

via Shared via Barbara Karnes – Just Because You Get Sad Doesn’t Mean You Aren’t Healing | Thought Catalog — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

End-of-Life, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

On the Day I Die — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

This speaks for itself. Read the words and realize it is important to live fully until the day you die!

 

Source: On the Day I Die

via On the Day I Die — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

End-of-Life, Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Is There a Right to Grieve? | Psychology Today — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

This needs to change. Grief is different for each person and the length of time different for each person…

 

Source: Is There a Right to Grieve? | Psychology Today

via Is There a Right to Grieve? | Psychology Today — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

Education, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Hate & Racism: Gets us Nowhere!

http://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwxMbR9Dk?oc=wa

Read this link! More companies need to express to their employees that hate and racism are unacceptable. No matter our socioeconomic status, our ethnicity, the culture we are from, the job we hold-we are all human and we all bleed red. What happened in Virginia last weekend should NEVER have happened!

One Holocaust was enough…Never again means just that…’never again.’

Dr. Martin Luther King said, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter.” I could not agree more.

Education, End-of-Life, Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Dunkirk…How Much do you Know About It?

I just saw the movie Dunkirk with my fiancé. No matter how many WWII movies I watch or how many books I read, I realize there are so many more stories to be told and I will NEVER learn all about the war. It is not possible.

There is much to gain from this movie. Many individuals to focus on and each individual did something small which lead to something great!

The takeaways from the movie are the sense of community that for the most part existed then, but seems to be missing in today’s world.

Imagine being a soldier who fights for your country and is shipped overseas to help other countries fight a war, then you are left behind in …let’s say a place named Dunkirk. You are left behind enemy lines, waiting to be rescued. Will you do as one of the characters from the movie did; you are a French soldier and you find a dead Englishman. Will you bury him and then steal his uniform to be able to leave the war zone?

Would you go back and save fellow soldiers from drowning after the boat that came to save you is torpedoed? How do you think you would both function and survive in a war?

Personally, I have no clue. I cannot imagine such circumstances today. I cannot imagine being stranded with no way to leave a country, but assuming and hoping that the country I am from is going to save me. I cannot imagine an era, although I grew up without the modern technology of today, no cell phones, no laptops, no tablets or Apple watches. No social media, and relying on intelligence and an army that in some ways are beat hoping that someone is going to rescue me and my fellow soldiers.

The death and destruction that was witnessed. The coldness that may have occurred, the uncaring, the ‘do what I need to, to survive mentality’. The symptoms that will show later; shell shock, PTSD, trauma, flashbacks, and I am going to assume after watching this movie, a hate for boats that sink, not liking water, motor oil or planes…

The positive I see is determination, the will to live/survive, hope, not giving up, focus, and a sense of community. Think all able bodied small motor boats in Britain, more than 800 of them were to be utilized or were ‘called up’ to assist the stranded soldiers.

The advancing German Army trapped the British and French armies on the beaches around Dunkirk. 330,000 men were trapped and they were a sitting target for the Germans. The beach at Dunkirk was on a shallow slope so no large boat could get near to the actual beaches where the men were.

The evacuation is often referred to as “the miracle of Dunkirk” because only 30,000 to 45,000 were to be rescued, but in fact, between May 26, 1940, and June 3, 1940, more than 300,000 troops were able to get off the beach. Nearly 80 years later, the “Dunkirk Spirit” remains a touchstone in British culture, and a reminder to face obstacles with the same tenacity and cooperation that got the Second World War troops through that dramatic evacuation.

The lesson(s) I gained from the movie was: determination, hope, stay positive, luck, give back, community, and honour…What about you?