Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Unfortunately for every “good” death, there are many which are much more stormy and drawn out.

It is sad to read and to know that most people in western society die in hospital or in an institution. Keeping death out of sight and out of mind in this way means that most people have little experience of death and dying.

https://theconversation.com/a-real-death-what-can-you-expect-during-a-loved-ones-final-hours-43619

“When illness or age present an inescapable conclusion to life, then it is the doctor’s dilemma to ensure a good death. However, the challenge is that this good death must occur within the constraint that medication must not be given to accelerate death, nor to relieve symptoms that are distressing to the family (as treatment is only permitted for the direct benefit of the patient).

Maybe it is time to question the belief that it is wrong to treat a dying patient in order to minimise the distress that their dying may cause their closest relatives. After all, few of us would desire our own deaths to be viewed as “something from a horror movie” and would support actions that might help our family at this difficult time.”

Read this article in full and take a look at another:

https://theconversation.com/we-need-to-get-over-our-fear-of-talking-about-dying-14186

 

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