Education, End-of-Life, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Talking to Family About Post Death Wishes — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

This is very important; discussing your post-death wishes with family and close friends. Do not wait until it is too late or crisis time. When you are very ill, in hospital or diagnosed as terminal; your thoughts might be elsewhere. Plan ahead as much as possible.

No one wants  to think they will die tomorrow, but in reality we never know. Some deaths are far in the future, others could be in the near future, and still others happen when we least expect it.

I keep thinking about what I would want. I know I do not want my kids to worry about it in any way and have to come up with the money for my funeral or worry about where to bury me. I am an organ donor. My driver’s license states so and I have told my kids and my fiancé this. I would like to be cremated and they can do with my ashes as they wish. I am not a person that wants a whole lot of ‘hooplah.’ I would rather have a celebration of life before I die if possible surrounded by the ones I care about and love. I do not want a large, dramatic funeral and I especially do not want anyone to lay out thousands of dollars. I would rather that money go to charity to help others.

I am practical, low-key, and down to earth. I was raised to focus on others and not myself. Charity and volunteering along with giving back to community are important to me.

This is the message I want my kids to walk away with. You need enough money to live on, put some away, and enjoy life a little and the extra should go to charity as there are always others that have less.

Thoughts?

 

Source: Talking to Family About Post Death Wishes

via Talking to Family About Post Death Wishes — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

News, Book Review

Book Review: Nomad on the Run by Georges Benay

Nomad on the Run by Georges Benay

 

I have to say from the first pages I liked this book. I liked the author’s writing style. I loved the storyline and I liked the characters.

The book looks a little unassuming as the cover is pretty plain. The title gave me the impression the book was about a nomad in the desert. Wrong!

The storyline is about a man who leaves his wife in Toronto and returns to the country he was born in, Morocco. He works in a small, private banking firm there and was recruited for this position. His life becomes a whirlwind and he knowns something is wrong. He falls in love and begins secretly dating the bank owner’s daughter.  He is asked in the middle of all the troubles to continue recruiting and hiring staff for this small exclusive private bank and to come up with a plan to save the bank  while there is an economic crisis going on around the world!

Who is involved? What is going on? Why are there secret meetings? How does the woman fit in? Is she involved? Can Eric trust Valerie?

Are you intrigued yet? I hope so and I believe like me, once you start the book, you get caught up in the storyline.

 

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Georges Benay

Author: Georges Benay

Georges Benay is a former international banker who is now working as a Toronto-based writer and award-winning photographer. He is the author of two novels, including The Nomad’s Premonition and a collection of short stories. His award winning pictures have been featured in several magazines and book covers.

Book Title:  Nomad on the Run (Book #1) by Georges Benay
Category:  Adult Fiction,  290 pages
Genre:  Thriller, mystery/suspense
Publisher:   Bookstand Publishing
Release date:  April 15, 2011

Tour dates: August 14 to Sept 15, 2017. ​Beneath the golden desert and azure seas of Morocco lurks a hidden world of greed, deceit and financial terrorism. But the players are not who you might think. Lured away from his seemingly idyllic life as a managing director for a major international bank in Toronto, Eric Martin returns to his ancestral roots in Morocco.

Tempted by a mysterious offer from a boutique financial firm, Eric soon discovers he has walked into the middle of a whirlwind where everyone has their own secret agenda, and he unwittingly has become the key to unlocking them all. From the broad avenues of Toronto to the mean streets of Casablanca, Eric rushes to discover the truth before time runs out. But who can he trust?

The power and attraction of money is strong. In the midst of a dangerous cast of characters, Jeff Offenbach, bank president, knows more than he lets on. But how much does he know? Is he a key player in a scheme to terrorize the global economy, or is he just trying to save his firm from becoming another victim of the global economic collapse? Valerie is the unknown factor. Is she involved in the partners’ machinations, or is she as guileless as Eric? Can he trust her? And more importantly, will he survive long enough to find out?

http://www.inthebookstand.com/

https://www.amazon.com/Georges-Benay/e/B072XVCK5N

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/

iRead Website new logo

 

 

 

 

 

Education, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Hate & Racism: Gets us Nowhere!

http://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwxMbR9Dk?oc=wa

Read this link! More companies need to express to their employees that hate and racism are unacceptable. No matter our socioeconomic status, our ethnicity, the culture we are from, the job we hold-we are all human and we all bleed red. What happened in Virginia last weekend should NEVER have happened!

One Holocaust was enough…Never again means just that…’never again.’

Dr. Martin Luther King said, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter.” I could not agree more.

End-of-Life, Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

How to Survive a Loved Ones Terminal Illness | How to Deal With a Sick Loved One | Coping Skills for Caretakers | Healthy Ways to Handle Dying Family Member – Beliefnet — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

An article worth reading whether you are going through this personally or you work with client’s or patients who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness.

 

Source: How to Survive a Loved Ones Terminal Illness | How to Deal With a Sick Loved One | Coping Skills for Caretakers | Healthy Ways to Handle Dying Family Member – Beliefnet

via How to Survive a Loved Ones Terminal Illness | How to Deal With a Sick Loved One | Coping Skills for Caretakers | Healthy Ways to Handle Dying Family Member – Beliefnet — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

Education, End-of-Life, Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Dunkirk…How Much do you Know About It?

I just saw the movie Dunkirk with my fiancé. No matter how many WWII movies I watch or how many books I read, I realize there are so many more stories to be told and I will NEVER learn all about the war. It is not possible.

There is much to gain from this movie. Many individuals to focus on and each individual did something small which lead to something great!

The takeaways from the movie are the sense of community that for the most part existed then, but seems to be missing in today’s world.

Imagine being a soldier who fights for your country and is shipped overseas to help other countries fight a war, then you are left behind in …let’s say a place named Dunkirk. You are left behind enemy lines, waiting to be rescued. Will you do as one of the characters from the movie did; you are a French soldier and you find a dead Englishman. Will you bury him and then steal his uniform to be able to leave the war zone?

Would you go back and save fellow soldiers from drowning after the boat that came to save you is torpedoed? How do you think you would both function and survive in a war?

Personally, I have no clue. I cannot imagine such circumstances today. I cannot imagine being stranded with no way to leave a country, but assuming and hoping that the country I am from is going to save me. I cannot imagine an era, although I grew up without the modern technology of today, no cell phones, no laptops, no tablets or Apple watches. No social media, and relying on intelligence and an army that in some ways are beat hoping that someone is going to rescue me and my fellow soldiers.

The death and destruction that was witnessed. The coldness that may have occurred, the uncaring, the ‘do what I need to, to survive mentality’. The symptoms that will show later; shell shock, PTSD, trauma, flashbacks, and I am going to assume after watching this movie, a hate for boats that sink, not liking water, motor oil or planes…

The positive I see is determination, the will to live/survive, hope, not giving up, focus, and a sense of community. Think all able bodied small motor boats in Britain, more than 800 of them were to be utilized or were ‘called up’ to assist the stranded soldiers.

The advancing German Army trapped the British and French armies on the beaches around Dunkirk. 330,000 men were trapped and they were a sitting target for the Germans. The beach at Dunkirk was on a shallow slope so no large boat could get near to the actual beaches where the men were.

The evacuation is often referred to as “the miracle of Dunkirk” because only 30,000 to 45,000 were to be rescued, but in fact, between May 26, 1940, and June 3, 1940, more than 300,000 troops were able to get off the beach. Nearly 80 years later, the “Dunkirk Spirit” remains a touchstone in British culture, and a reminder to face obstacles with the same tenacity and cooperation that got the Second World War troops through that dramatic evacuation.

The lesson(s) I gained from the movie was: determination, hope, stay positive, luck, give back, community, and honour…What about you?

End-of-Life, Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

When a Pet Dies, Helping Children Through the ‘Worst Day of Their Lives’ – The New York Times — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

When I was growing up, my parents always had at least 3-4 dogs at a time and eventually a cat or two also.  Pets were part of my life from birth until age 22. When I moved out on my own I did not get a pet (fish do not count) as I went off to university for six years and I worked and went to school so little time for pets. Plus, as I was home so little, I felt it was unfair to have a pet.

When I married, my then husband and I, got a puppy a few years after we married. Zoe was a beautiful part black lab….

After I left my husband, I got a kitten for my kids; She was 5 1/2 months old and here we are 31 months later with a cat and the two newest additions are mini-bunnies (got them a few weeks ago and they are currently 7 weeks old). My kids got a dog with their dad this past winter and so they are fortunate to have pets at both parents homes.

Zoe died over two years ago and actually she was put down because she was so sick. My kids told me how difficult it was and they had known Zoe since they were born. They still talk about her and miss her.

Pets bring joy, responsibility, and unconditional love. They teach kids to be responsible as they rely on their humans to feed them, give them water, play with them, take them out, take them to the vets and to just be there.

Pets are often the first time a child experiences death. For my kids, they had many other experiences of death though, their paternal great-grandmother, a school friend (age 6), My great-uncle, their uncles’ parent’s, some of my clients whom they had met over the years…

My kids take it in stride, but I know death is not easy. For my youngest, she still talks about her friend that was in a tragic accident at age 6, 3.5 years ago.

Death is a part of life and it needs to be recognized and discussed. To not do so will cause problems later on and we as parents do our kids no favors by ‘protecting’ them from death. Everything dies and I tell my kids this all the time. The grass will die, the trees will die, flowers die, pets will die and we as humans will eventually die…

 

via When a Pet Dies, Helping Children Through the ‘Worst Day of Their Lives’ – The New York Times — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

End-of-Life, Grief/Grieving/Bereavement, Humanity, Social Work/Helping Profession/Mental Health

Terminally Ill and Pregnant Mom of 5 on Life Support | POPSUGAR Moms — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library

Wow! This article certainly puts things into perspective!!

If this was you, as a mom, what would you choose? I cannot even imagine making that decision….. and I do not see my fiancé being ok with the choice of me saying, “I want the baby to live.” But in essence do I really know what I would choose or what he would choose without being in this situation?

 

Source: Terminally Ill and Pregnant Mom of 5 on Life Support | POPSUGAR Moms

via Terminally Ill and Pregnant Mom of 5 on Life Support | POPSUGAR Moms — Loss, Grief, Bereavement and Life Transitions Resource Library